09Mexico3-master675.jpg

Earthquake Kills 5 in Mexico

September 08, 2017

A massive earthquake has struck off the southern coast of Mexico on Thursday night, killing at least five people.

The quake measured an 8.1 on the Richter scale, according to the US Geological Survey, and has been called “the biggest magnitude to be recorded in our country in at least the last 100 years” by Mexican president, Enrique Pena Nieto.

The quake was so powerful that it caused buildings to shudder violently in Mexico City, the country’s capital, over 1000 kilometres away.

The deaths included two children, one who died when their respirator lost power, and another was killed by a collapsing wall.

Severe damage and destruction to property has been reported in southern Mexico and in western Guatemala, where one person was also killed.

The quake has sparked massive evacuations in fear of aftershocks and tsunamis. The US Tsunami Warning System said that tsunami waves are possible on the Pacific coasts of several Central American countries, including Guatemala and El Salvador.

A tsunami wave has also been predicted for Mexico, with the water likely to rise up to three metres above tide level.

President Pena Nieto assured citizens via Twitter that he is overseeing the country’s emergency response teams from the National Disaster Prevention Center.

Image: Earthquake aftermath in Mexico [online image] (2017) sourced on 8 September 2017 from https://static01.nyt.com/images/2017/09/09/world/09Mexico3/09Mexico3-master675.jpg.